Portfolios: Covers: Soaring Heavens, China

Photo for March 2012: Soaring HeavensSeems like I have been getting lucky with birds for these 2 months. In the image for February's cover, I was shooting a single specimen of the Common Mynah in Singapore. For this month, during a trip in Yunnan, China, we headed to the seaside where hordes of seagulls were waiting to be fed by locals and tourists alike. The migrant birds were from Siberia and will be around till May. During the shooting frenzy, I noticed a lone cloud forming up near the dipping sun. Taking note of the potential, I went firing away at the lady hand feeding the gulls and screaming when they got too close. Ten minutes later, the sun was hidden by the cloud and sunbeams were appearing. Rushing to a spot where the gulls were hanging still in the breeze, I switched to a smaller aperture to ensure there was enough depth of field to keep the bird sharp, underexposed one stop and fired away. One look at the histogram confirmed I had some part of the clouds burnt but that is no issue. Any more underexposing and the sky would have been compromised.Canon EOS 5D Mark II w/ Canon 16-35 II L, processed in Aperture and Photoshop.
Soaring Heavens, China

Photo for March 2012: Soaring Heavens 

Seems like I have been getting lucky with birds for these 2 months. In the image for February's cover, I was shooting a single specimen of the Common Mynah in Singapore. For this month, during a trip in Yunnan, China, we headed to the seaside where hordes of seagulls were waiting to be fed by locals and tourists alike.  

The migrant birds were from Siberia and will be around till May. During the shooting frenzy, I noticed a lone cloud forming up near the dipping sun. Taking note of the potential, I went firing away at the lady hand feeding the gulls and screaming when they got too close.  

Ten minutes later, the sun was hidden by the cloud and sunbeams were appearing. Rushing to a spot where the gulls were hanging still in the breeze, I switched to a smaller aperture to ensure there was enough depth of field to keep the bird sharp, underexposed one stop and fired away. One look at the histogram confirmed I had some part of the clouds burnt but that is no issue. Any more underexposing and the sky would have been compromised. 

Canon EOS 5D Mark II w/ Canon 16-35 II L, processed in Aperture and Photoshop.